Type your paragraph here.

 

Sally’s WINE STORY

     The owners are all siblings, Charlie Jr., Donnell, Doug, Derek and Mildred vow to keep family first in their wine business journey. Their mother Emma Jewel Richardson-Quimbley, known by many as “Sally ” instilled in her children at an early age the importance of family and hard work.  Meanwhile, Sally went through many trials, tribulations, and hardships that were inflicted upon her; she never gave up the fight in the well-being of her children. When she was very young her parent divorced and she was forced to live with her maternal grandparents in the red clay hills of South Georgia.  Her grandfather was a moonshiner who taught Sally a trick or two about the business of moonshining. He was also a sharecropper by day and a moonshiner by night. Often making Sally and her sister Mildred dig holes in the ground to hide the whiskey so it would not be found by the law officials. It was said that her grandfather made the best white lighting in the county by cooking and pouring sunflower seed oil over into the whiskey to give it a clear white color. He also made the best selection of fruit wines such as blackberry and peach wines. Many people frequently visited their home to get a quick shot of that moonshine to calm their spirit.

     At the ripe old age of seventeen, Sally’s desire was to leave home for fearing that she would be shipped to Akron, Ohio to her mother.  But, Sally escaped this most feared decision by marrying at the very young age of seventeen and remained married for fifty years until her premature death in 2001.

     Once married, her husband tried to venture out into the moonshine business for several years by constructing liquor stills in the backwoods of Baconton, Georgia.  He would often hide his moonshine by digging holes under the railroad tracks. The moonshine could often be found fermenting in the chicken coops. The fragrance of fresh bulk was a common aroma around the Quimbley’s house. However, after several raids and with a threat of prison time by law officials, Sally’s husband decided that it was time to give up the moonshine business and go into the swine business. Every now and then Sally would make a batch of her sweet blackberry wine with blackberries picked from her farm.

     At this point, Sally began working two jobs in an effort to help support her family. She begun working at a local poultry plant at night and by day she would work in the crusty hot cotton fields during the fall and in the pecan groves during the bitter cold winters.  Sally and her children could be often seen in the fields pickling cucumbers, watermelons, picking up corn, and even pulling weeds out of peanuts. Most of the time you could find Sally sitting on a five gallon bucket in her backyard reading the newspaper. She especially loved talking about politics, civil rights, her children, and Lee Iacocca (former CEO of Chrysler). Sally’s like cooking like women did in the olden days, things such as venison, wild turkey, wild goose, hog head cheese and many other favorite recipes that will be available on Sally’s Creek Website. All of her favorite things can be seen around Sally’s Creek Farm Winery and Vineyard.

     Five of the most important things that Sally’s instilled in her children were the important of hardwork, reading, education, and family. But most of all she believed in the good book as she would most often say, “The Holy Bible.”Sally’s WINE STORY

     The owners are all siblings, Charlie Jr., Donnell, Doug, Derek and Mildred vow to keep family first in their wine business journey. Their mother Emma Jewel Richardson-Quimbley, known by many as “Sally ” instilled in her children at an early age the importance of family and hard work.  Meanwhile, Sally went through many trials, tribulations, and hardships that were inflicted upon her; she never gave up the fight in the well-being of her children. When she was very young her parent divorced and she was forced to live with her maternal grandparents in the red clay hills of South Georgia.  Her grandfather was a moonshiner who taught Sally a trick or two about the business of moonshining. He was also a sharecropper by day and a moonshiner by night. Often making Sally and her sister Mildred dig holes in the ground to hide the whiskey so it would not be found by the law officials. It was said that her grandfather made the best white lighting in the county by cooking and pouring sunflower seed oil over into the whiskey to give it a clear white color. He also made the best selection of fruit wines such as blackberry and peach wines. Many people frequently visited their home to get a quick shot of that moonshine to calm their spirit.

     At the ripe old age of seventeen, Sally’s desire was to leave home for fearing that she would be shipped to Akron, Ohio to her mother.  But, Sally escaped this most feared decision by marrying at the very young age of seventeen and remained married for fifty years until her premature death in 2001.

     Once married, her husband tried to venture out into the moonshine business for several years by constructing liquor stills in the backwoods of Baconton, Georgia.  He would often hide his moonshine by digging holes under the railroad tracks. The moonshine could often be found fermenting in the chicken coops. The fragrance of fresh bulk was a common aroma around the Quimbley’s house. However, after several raids and with a threat of prison time by law officials, Sally’s husband decided that it was time to give up the moonshine business and go into the swine business. Every now and then Sally would make a batch of her sweet blackberry wine with blackberries picked from her farm.

     At this point, Sally began working two jobs in an effort to help support her family. She begun working at a local poultry plant at night and by day she would work in the crusty hot cotton fields during the fall and in the pecan groves during the bitter cold winters.  Sally and her children could be often seen in the fields pickling cucumbers, watermelons, picking up corn, and even pulling weeds out of peanuts. Most of the time you could find Sally sitting on a five gallon bucket in her backyard reading the newspaper. She especially loved talking about politics, civil rights, her children, and Lee Iacocca (former CEO of Chrysler). Sally’s like cooking like women did in the olden days, things such as venison, wild turkey, wild goose, hog head cheese and many other favorite recipes that will be available on Sally’s Creek Website. All of her favorite things can be seen around Sally’s Creek Farm Winery and Vineyard.

     Five of the most important things that Sally’s instilled in her children were the important of hardwork, reading, education, and family. But most of all she believed in the good book as she would most often say, “The Holy Bible.”Sally’s WINE STORY

     The owners are all siblings, Charlie Jr., Donnell, Doug, Derek and Mildred vow to keep family first in their wine business journey. Their mother Emma Jewel Richardson-Quimbley, known by many as “Sally ” instilled in her children at an early age the importance of family and hard work.  Meanwhile, Sally went through many trials, tribulations, and hardships that were inflicted upon her; she never gave up the fight in the well-being of her children. When she was very young her parent divorced and she was forced to live with her maternal grandparents in the red clay hills of South Georgia.  Her grandfather was a moonshiner who taught Sally a trick or two about the business of moonshining. He was also a sharecropper by day and a moonshiner by night. Often making Sally and her sister Mildred dig holes in the ground to hide the whiskey so it would not be found by the law officials. It was said that her grandfather made the best white lighting in the county by cooking and pouring sunflower seed oil over into the whiskey to give it a clear white color. He also made the best selection of fruit wines such as blackberry and peach wines. Many people frequently visited their home to get a quick shot of that moonshine to calm their spirit.

     At the ripe old age of seventeen, Sally’s desire was to leave home for fearing that she would be shipped to Akron, Ohio to her mother.  But, Sally escaped this most feared decision by marrying at the very young age of seventeen and remained married for fifty years until her premature death in 2001.

     Once married, her husband tried to venture out into the moonshine business for several years by constructing liquor stills in the backwoods of Baconton, Georgia.  He would often hide his moonshine by digging holes under the railroad tracks. The moonshine could often be found fermenting in the chicken coops. The fragrance of fresh bulk was a common aroma around the Quimbley’s house. However, after several raids and with a threat of prison time by law officials, Sally’s husband decided that it was time to give up the moonshine business and go into the swine business. Every now and then Sally would make a batch of her sweet blackberry wine with blackberries picked from her farm.

     At this point, Sally began working two jobs in an effort to help support her family. She begun working at a local poultry plant at night and by day she would work in the crusty hot cotton fields during the fall and in the pecan groves during the bitter cold winters.  Sally and her children could be often seen in the fields pickling cucumbers, watermelons, picking up corn, and even pulling weeds out of peanuts. Most of the time you could find Sally sitting on a five gallon bucket in her backyard reading the newspaper. She especially loved talking about politics, civil rights, her children, and Lee Iacocca (former CEO of Chrysler). Sally’s like cooking like women did in the olden days, things such as venison, wild turkey, wild goose, hog head cheese and many other favorite recipes that will be available on Sally’s Creek Website. All of her favorite things can be seen around Sally’s Creek Farm Winery and Vineyard.

     Five of the most important things that Sally’s instilled in her children were the important of hardwork, reading, education, and family. But most of all she believed in the good book as she would most often say, “The Holy Bible.”